Observational Astronomy : Techniques and Instrumentation.

An essential text for graduate students in astronomy and physics, providing a thorough review of modern observational techniques and instruments.

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Sutton, Edmund C.
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2011.
Subjects:
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Table of Contents:
  • Cover; OBSERVATIONAL ASTRONOMY; Title; Copyright; Contents; Illustrations; Tables; Preface; Acknowledgements; 1 Astrophysical information; 1.1 Electromagnetic radiation; 1.2 Other carriers of information; 1.3 Intervening regions; 1.3.1 Intergalactic/interstellar medium; 1.3.2 Interplanetary medium; 1.3.3 Earth's atmosphere; Radio and microwave absorption; Lorentzian line shape; Infrared absorption and background; Low frequency EM wave propagation; Airglow; Rayleigh scattering; Atmospheric turbulence; Exercises; 2 Photometry; 2.1 Specific intensity (brightness); 2.2 Étendue.
  • 2.3 Moments of the specific intensity2.4 Energy density; 2.5 Flux from a surface of uniform brightness; 2.6 Blackbody radiation; 2.7 Atmospheric extinction (calibration); 2.8 Absolute calibration; 2.9 Photometric magnitudes; Exercises; 3 Positional astronomy; 3.1 Fundamental reference system; 3.2 Time systems; 3.2.1 Atomic time; 3.2.2 Astronomical time scales; 3.2.3 Sidereal time; 3.2.4 Solar time; 3.3 Spherical astronomy; 3.3.1 Spherical coordinates (in general); 3.3.2 Latitude and longitude; 3.3.3 Equatorial coordinates; 3.3.4 Horizon coordinate system (alt/az).
  • 3.3.5 Conversion formulae (alt/az? ha/dec)3.3.6 Ecliptic coordinates; 3.3.7 Galactic coordinates; 3.3.8 Spherical trigonometry; 3.3.9 Rotation matrices; 3.4 Epoch; 3.5 Changes in equatorial coordinates; 3.5.1 Proper motion; 3.5.2 Precession; 3.5.3 Nutation; 3.5.4 Parallax; 3.5.5 Aberration of starlight; 3.5.6 Reduction of celestial coordinates (overview); 3.5.7 Gravitational deflection of light; 3.5.8 Refraction; 3.5.9 Parallactic angle; 3.6 Astrometry; 3.6.1 Historical techniques; 3.6.2 Hipparcos; Exercises; 4 Fourier transforms; 4.1 Fourier series; 4.2 Fourier integrals.
  • 4.2.1 Relationship to the Dirac delta (impulse) function4.2.2 Parseval's theorem (Rayleigh's theorem); 4.2.3 Properties of Fourier transforms; 4.2.4 Convolution; 4.2.5 Autocorrelation (Wiener-Khinchin theorem); 4.2.6 Common functions and Fourier transform pairs; 4.2.7 Aliasing and Shannon's sampling theorem; 4.3 Higher-dimensional Fourier transforms; 4.3.1 Hankel (Fourier-Bessel) transforms; Exercises; 5 Detection systems; 5.1 Interaction of radiation and matter; 5.2 Photoelectric effect; 5.3 Compton scattering; 5.4 Pair production; 5.5 Electromagnetic wave interactions.
  • 5.6 Optical and ultraviolet detectors5.6.1 Photomultipliers; 5.6.2 Other electron multiplication devices; 5.6.3 Solid state detectors; Silicon diode detectors; Charge-coupled devices; 5.7 Infrared astronomy; 5.7.1 Infrared photoconductors; 5.7.2 NICMOS; 5.7.3 Bolometers; 5.7.4 Spitzer; 5.7.5 Herschel; 5.7.6 WFIRST; Exercises; 6 Orthodox statistics; 6.1 Probability distributions; 6.1.1 Binomial distribution; 6.1.2 Poisson distribution; 6.1.3 Gaussian (normal) distribution; 6.2 Moments of a probability distribution; 6.3 Characteristic (moment-generating) function; 6.4 Central limit theorem.