The economic burden of providing health insurance : how much worse off are small firms? /

More than 60 percent of nonelderly Americans receive health-insurance (HI) coverage through employers, either as policyholders or as dependents. However, rising health-care costs are leading many to question the long-term viability of the employer-based insurance system. Concerns about the economic...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Eibner, Christine.
Corporate Authors: Kauffman-RAND Institute for Entrepreneurship Public Policy., Institute for Civil Justice (U.S.)
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Santa Monica, CA : RAND Corp., 2008.
Series:Technical report (Rand Corporation) ; TR-559-EMKF.
Subjects:
Online Access:CONNECT
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Description
Summary:More than 60 percent of nonelderly Americans receive health-insurance (HI) coverage through employers, either as policyholders or as dependents. However, rising health-care costs are leading many to question the long-term viability of the employer-based insurance system. Concerns about the economic burden of providing HI are particularly acute for small businesses, which are both less likely than larger firms to offer HI and more sensitive to price when deciding to offer insurance. Small firms may have difficulty containing costs due to their limited bargaining power and their inability to hir.
Item Description:"This research was conducted within the Kauffman-Rand Institute for Entrepreneurship Public Policy in the Rand Institute for Civil Justice"--Preface.
Physical Description:1 online resource (xvii, 62 pages) : illustrations.
Bibliography:Includes bibliographical references (pages 59-62).
ISBN:9780833045027
0833045024
9780833047823
0833047825