Self-regulation and human progress : how society gains when we govern less /

Does humanity progress primarily through leaders organizing and directing followers, or through trial and error by individuals free to chart their own path? For most of human history ruling classes had the capacity and the desire to tightly regiment society, to the general detriment of progress. But...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Osborne, Evan, 1964- (Author)
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Stanford, California : Stanford Economics and Finance, an imprint of Stanford University Press, [2018]
Subjects:
Online Access:CONNECT
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Description
Summary:Does humanity progress primarily through leaders organizing and directing followers, or through trial and error by individuals free to chart their own path? For most of human history ruling classes had the capacity and the desire to tightly regiment society, to the general detriment of progress. But beginning in the 1500s, Europeans developed a series of arguments for simply leaving well enough alone. First in the form of the scientific method, then in the form of free expression, and finally in the form of the continuously, spontaneously reordered free market, people began to accept that progress is hard, and requires that an immense number of mistakes be tolerated so that we may learn from them. This work tells the story of the development of these three ideas, and for the first time tells of the mutual influence among them.
Physical Description:1 online resource (xiii, 251 pages)
Bibliography:Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN:9781503604247
1503604241