Coercion, survival, and war : why weak states resist the United States /

In asymmetric interstate conflicts, great powers have the capability to coerce weak states by threatening their survival-but not vice versa. It is therefore the great power that decides whether to escalate a conflict into a crisis by adopting a coercive strategy. In practice, however, the coercive s...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Haun, Phil M. (Author)
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Stanford, California : Stanford University Press, [2015]
Series:Stanford security studies.
Subjects:
Online Access:CONNECT
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Description
Summary:In asymmetric interstate conflicts, great powers have the capability to coerce weak states by threatening their survival-but not vice versa. It is therefore the great power that decides whether to escalate a conflict into a crisis by adopting a coercive strategy. In practice, however, the coercive strategies of the US have frequently failed. In this volume, Phil Haun chronicles 30 asymmetric interstate crises involving the US from 1918 to 2003.
Physical Description:1 online resource (xii, 271 pages) : illustrations, maps
Bibliography:Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN:9780804795074
080479507X