The new order and last orientation / edited by Jürgen Gebhardt and Thomas A. Hollweck ; with an introduction by Jürgen Gebhardt.

Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Voegelin, Eric, 1901-1985.
Other Authors: Gebhardt, Jürgen., Hollweck, Thomas A.
Format: Book
Language:English
Published: Columbia, Mo. : University of Missouri Press, ©1999.
Series:Voegelin, Eric, 1901-1985. Works. 1989 ; 25.
Voegelin, Eric, 1901- History of political ideas ; v. 7.
Subjects:
Online Access:CONNECT
Table of Contents:
  • Editor's Introduction; I. Interpreting the Modern World- Voegelin's Unfinished Story of the Predicament of Modernity; II. The Paradigm of the "Political Idea"; III. A Paradigm Lost and the Hermeneutical Turn to the "Historicity of Truth"; IV. Epilogue: The Spiritual Realist; Editors' Note; contents; PART SEVEN THE NEW ORDER; The National State; 1. Tabula Rasa; 2. In Search of Order; 3. Hobbes; The English Revolution; 1. The English Situation; 2. James I; 3. The Clash with Court and Parliament; 4. The Church Constitution-The May ower Compact; 5. The Restriction of Royal Power.
  • 6. The Trend toward Sovereignty of Parliament7. The Covenants; 8. The Solemn Engagement of the Army; 9. The Agreement of the People; 10. The Issues of the Franchise; 11. The Charge against Charles I-The Declaration of Independence; 12. Massachusetts Bay, Connecticut, Rhode Island; 13. Milton; 14. Winstanley; 15. Harrington; Cromwell; 1. The Wars of the Fronde-State vs. Estates; 2. The Continent and England-State and Stateless Political Society; 3. The Parliament and the State of England; 4. The Position of Cromwell; 5. Cromwell and the Will of God; 6. The Politics of Cromwell.
  • Fronde and Monarchy in France1. The Parlement; 2. The Cardinal de Retz; 3. Louis XIV; Spinoza; 1. Orientalism; 2. The Program of the De Intellectus Emendatione; 3. Mysticism; 4. Esotericism; 5. Hobbes and Spinoza; 6. Theory of Power; 7. Liberalism; 8. The Project of Government; 9. The Oath; Locke; 1. The Contract Theory; 2. The Theory of Limited Monarchy; 3. The Relation with Richard Hooker; 4. The Victorious Puritan; 5. Locke's Writings on Toleration; 6. Toleration and the New Pattern of Revolution; 7. Facets of Toleration in the Seventeenth Century.
  • 8. The Lord's Dutch Lunch9. God: The Proprietor of Man; 10. Man: The Proprietor of Himself; 11. The Civil State-Money and Differentiation of Property; 12. The Equal Protection of Inequality; 13. Spiritual Disease-The Revolution- Breeding Element; Intermission; 1. The First Cycle: Order against Spirit; 2. The Second Cycle: The Reassertion of Spirit; 3. Spleen and Skepticism; 4. Montesquieu; 5. The Enlargement of the Geographical Horizon: The Biological Diversification of Mankind; PART EIGHT LAST ORIENTATION; Introductory Remarks; Phenomenalism; 1. Phenomenalism and Science.
  • Schelling1. The Realist in an Age of Disintegration; 2. Elements of Schelling's Position; 3. Schelling's Speculation; 4. Historical Existence: The Key to Speculation; 5. Orgiastic Existence; 6. Promethean Existence; 7. Political Existence; 8. Nirvana; 9. Conclusion; Note on Hölderlin; Nietzsche and Pascal; I; II; III; IV; V; VI; Index.