Protest camps / Anna Feigenbaum, Fabian Frenzel and Patrick McCurdy.

From Tahrir Square to St Paul's Cathedral, from the Red Shirts in Thailand to the Teachers in Oaxaca, protest camps are a highly visible feature of activism, where people come together to imagine alternative worlds and articulate contentious politics, often in confrontation with the state. Exam...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Authors: Feigenbaum, Anna, (Author), Frenzel, Fabian, 1975- (Author), McCurdy, Patrick, 1975- (Author)
Format: Book
Language:English
Published: London : Zed Books, 2013.
Subjects:
Online Access:CONNECT
Table of Contents:
  • Cover
  • About the authors
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • Contents
  • Illustrations
  • Acknowledgements
  • Introduction
  • The multiple origins of organised camping
  • 0.1 Global protest camps prior to 2011
  • What makes a 'protest camp'?
  • The link between protest camps and (new) social movements
  • Concept soup
  • 0.2 The concept soup
  • Infrastructural analysis and book structure
  • 0.3 The infrastructures of protest camps
  • An historical review of selected protest camps
  • 0.4 Welcome tents like this one at Occupy Bristol form a central feature of many protest camps.
  • 0.5 Tents in the evening sun at HoriZone protest camp, Stirling, July 2005
  • 0.6 The library of Occupy LSX
  • 1 Infrastructures and practices of protest camping
  • Introduction
  • Protest camps and crafting a homeplace
  • Infrastructures
  • 1.1 A noticeboard at Heiligendamm anti-G8 camp in Germany, 2007
  • 1.2 The Oaxaca encampments in 2006 filled the city's streets
  • 1.3 The spokescouncil model
  • 1.4 Compost toilets are part of the holistic, permaculture-inspired, ecological outlook of protest camps
  • Exposing the law.
  • 1.5 Laws and legal battles can form part of the struggle to create camps
  • 'Travelling' infrastructures
  • 1.6 Infrastructures travel, with tripods being used at different UK Climate Camps, including here at Kingsnorth in 2008
  • 1.7 Note of solidarity at Occupy LSX
  • Conclusion
  • 2 Media and communication infrastructures
  • Introduction
  • Adaptations
  • 2.1 Entrance to the HoriZoneprotest camp, Stirling, July 2005
  • 2.2 A media tent is part of many protest camps
  • Alternatives
  • 2.3 Mainshill Solidarity Camp zine teaches readers how to build a bender
  • Print-based media.
  • 2.4 True Unity News was published in the Resurrection City camp
  • 2.5 Greenham Common's communication infrastructures included on-site media-making and off-site offices
  • 2.6 The debut issue of The Occupied Wall Street Journal, October 2011
  • 2.7 The Tahrir Square media tent
  • Conclusion
  • 3 Protest action infrastructures
  • Introduction
  • 3.1 Protest camping as direct action
  • Protest camps as places of protest action
  • The question of violence
  • Diversity of tactics
  • Protest action ecology
  • 3.2 Climate Camp in the City at the G20 meeting in London, 2009
  • Protest action ecosystems.
  • 3.3 Police violence often reveals the race, class and gender oppressions that operate in protest camps
  • 3.4 Kate Evans' abseiling handbook
  • Conclusion
  • 4 Governance infrastructures
  • Introduction
  • 4.1 The hand signals of consensus decision-making popularised by Occupy
  • Organic horizontality and partial organisation
  • The organised camp and organic horizontality
  • Resurrection City and anarchitecture
  • Anti-nuclear occupations
  • The development of formalised consensus decision-making
  • Horizontality without formal horizontal decision-making.