Conversational storytelling among Japanese women : conversational circumstances, social circumstances and tellability of stories / Mariko Karatsu.

This book presents research findings on the overall process of storytelling as a social event in Japanese everyday conversations focusing on the relationship between a story and surrounding talks, the social and cultural aspects of the participants, and the tellability of conversational stories. Foc...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Karatsu, Mariko.
Format: Book
Language:English
Published: Amsterdam ; Philadelphia : John Benjamins Pub. Company, 2012.
Series:Studies in narrative ; v. 16.
Subjects:
Online Access:CONNECT
Table of Contents:
  • Conversational Storytelling among Japanese Women
  • Editorial page
  • Title page
  • LCC data
  • Table of contents
  • Acknowledgements
  • Chapter 1. Introduction
  • 1.1 Overview
  • Storytelling and the social and conversational circumstances
  • 1.2 Previous research
  • 1.3 Three tasks of this book
  • 1.3.1 Task 1: Examining the conversational circumstances
  • 1.3.2 Task 2: Exploring tellability
  • 1.3.3 Task 3: Interpreting the conversation in light of the social circumstances
  • 1.4 Analysis
  • 1.4.1 Analysis of conversational circumstances and the story teller's "groundwork"
  • 1.4.2 Analysis of the prospective story recipients' interest in the teller's life
  • 1.4.3 Analysis of the story recipients' understanding and involvement
  • 1.4.4 Analysis of participants' lives in the storytelling
  • 1.5 Conclusion
  • Chapter 2. Major concepts and conversational data for this study
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Previous research on organization of storytelling
  • 2.2.1 Sequential aspect of storytelling
  • 2.2.2 Participation in storytelling
  • 2.2.3 Organization of storytelling in Japanese conversation
  • 2.3 Previous research on social functions of storytelling
  • 2.3.1 Interpersonal and social work throughout storytelling
  • 2.3.2 Presentation of identity and self
  • 2.4 Previous research on tellability of a story in conversational interaction
  • 2.5 Conversational circumstances, social circumstances, and tellability of a story in this study
  • 2.6 Conversational data
  • Chapter 3. Story teller's groundwork to introduce a story
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 Continuity/discontinuity of the story from the previous talk
  • 3.3 Initial characterization
  • 3.4 Story recipient's knowledge
  • 3.5 Social appropriateness
  • 3.6 Conclusion
  • Chapter 4. Confirmation request to create a ground
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 The utterance of confirmation request.
  • 4.3 Shifting topical focus and doing other jobs
  • 4.3.1 Shifting topical focus
  • 4.3.2 Hinting at the initial characterization of the story
  • 4.3.3 Taking care of a delicate topic
  • 4.4 Conclusion
  • Chapter 5. Story recipient's interest in the teller's life
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 The stories triggered by the recipients' proffering the teller's topic
  • 5.2.1 Proffering the teller's topic
  • 5.2.2 Satisfying the recipient's potential interests: The story "I Ended Up Going to Canada with My Mother"
  • 5.2.3 Moving away from the recipient's interest while searching an attraction: The story "A Surprising Meeting with a Retired Lady"
  • 5.3 Showing interest in the teller's unusual conduct and the story teller's denying it
  • 5.3.1 Revealing a hearsay and the teller's rejection of it: The story "I Just Went to a Study Group Meeting"
  • 5.3.2 Showing surprise and the teller's telling a defensive story: The story "Santa Claus Costume"
  • 5.4 Conclusion
  • Chapter 6. Story recipients' understanding of a story and the conversational circumstances
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Understanding the point of the story by referring to the previous talk: The story "You Sure Can Eat a Lot!"
  • 6.3 Seeking the point of the story by referring to the previous talk: The story "I Heated a Glass Bowl"
  • 6.4 Understanding the detached story by the teller's re-depiction: The story "Ms. Ueda and Mr. Hirai Bowed to Each Other"
  • 6.5 Conclusion
  • Chapter 7. Story recipients' involvement in the storytelling and shared knowledge
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 The recipients' verbal and nonverbal display of involvement
  • 7.3 Showing involvement by repetition and laughter
  • 7.3.1 Showing involvement by repeating the teller's phrases with laughter: The story "A Surprising Meeting with a Retired Lady."
  • 7.3.2 Showing involvement by repeating a punch line phrase from the previous story: The story "A 'Happy Birthday' Song at a Restaurant"
  • 7.4 Conclusion
  • Chapter 8. Participants' lives in the storytelling "The Undergraduate Student's Complaint"
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 Overview of the storytelling "The Undergraduate Student's Complaint"
  • 8.3 Analysis: The participants' participation and their management of responsibility
  • 8.3.1 Eliciting and offering background information
  • 8.3.2 Forming the story "The Undergraduate Student's Complaint" and displaying involvement
  • 8.3.3 Offering follow-up information and raising a new issue
  • 8.4 Discussion: Participants' roles in the community
  • 8.5 Conclusion
  • Chapter 9. Conclusion
  • 9.1 Overview
  • 9.2 Storytelling and the conversational and social circumstances
  • 9.3 The four elements for the story's tellability
  • 9.4 The three tasks and findings
  • 9.4.1 The story teller's "groundwork"
  • Continuity/discontinuity of the story to the ongoing conversation
  • Initial characterization
  • Recipient's knowledge
  • Social appropriateness
  • Confirmation request
  • 9.4.2 The story recipients' interest in the teller's life
  • 9.4.3 The story recipients' understanding and involvement
  • 9.4.4 The participants' lives in the storytelling
  • 9.5 Concluding remarks
  • References
  • Appendix A. Meetings and participants
  • Appendix B. Stories in this book
  • Appendix C. Transcription conventions
  • Name index
  • Subject index.