Discrete charm of the machine : why the world became digital / Ken Steiglitz.

Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Steiglitz, Kenneth, 1939- (Author)
Format: Book
Language:English
Published: Princeton : Princeton University Press, [2019]
Subjects:
Online Access:CONNECT
Table of Contents:
  • Cover; Title Page; Copyright Page; CONTENTS; To the Reader; Part I / A Century of Valves; 1 The Discrete Revolution; 1.1 My Golden Age of Garbage; 1.2 Nostalgia and the Aesthetics of Technology; 1.3 Some Terminology; 2 What's Wrong with Analog?; 2.1 Signals and Noise; 2.2 Reproduction and Storage; 2.3 The Origins of Noise; 2.4 Thermal Noise in Electronics; 2.5 Other Noise in Electronics; 2.6 Digital Immunity; 2.7 Analog Rot; 2.8 Caveats; 3 Signal Standardization; 3.1 A Reminiscence; 3.2 Ones and Zeros; 3.3 Directivity of Control; 3.4 Gates; 3.5 The Electron; 3.6 Edison's Lightbulb Problems
  • 3.7 De Forest's Audion3.8 The Vacuum Tube as Valve; 3.9 The Rest of Logic; 3.10 Clocks and Doorbells; 3.11 Memory; 3.12 Other Ways to Build Valves; 4 Consequential Physics; 4.1 When Physics Became Discrete; 4.2 The Absolute Size of Things; 4.3 The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle; 4.4 Explaining Wave-Particle Duality; 4.5 The Pauli Exclusion Principle; 4.6 Atomic Physics; 4.7 Semiconductors; 4.8 The P-N Junction; 4.9 The Transistor; 4.10 Quantum Tunneling; 4.11 Speed; 5 Your Computer Is a Photograph; 5.1 Room at the Bottom; 5.2 The Computer as Microphotograph
  • 5.3 Heisenberg in the Chip Foundry5.4 Moore's Law and the Time of Silicon:ca. 1960-?; 5.5 The Exponential Wall; Part II / Sound and Pictures; 6 Music from Bits; 6.1 The Monster in 1957; 6.2 A Chance Encounter with a D-to-A Converter; 6.3 Sampling and Monsieur Fourier; 6.4 Nyquist's Sampling Principle; 6.5 Another Win for Digital; 6.6 Another Isomorphism; 7 Communication in a Noisy World; 7.1 Claude Shannon's 1948 Paper; 7.2 Measuring Information; 7.3 Entropy; 7.4 Noisy Channels; 7.5 Coding; 7.6 The Noisy Coding Theorem; 7.7 Another Win for Digital; Part III / Computation; 8 Analog Computers
  • 8.1 From the Ancient Greeks8.2 More Ingenious Devices; 8.3 Deeper Questions; 8.4 Computing with Soap Films; 8.5 Local and Global; 8.6 Differential Equations; 8.7 Integration; 8.8 Lord Kelvin's Research Program; 8.9 The Electronic Analog Computer; 9 Turing's Machine; 9.1 The Ingredients of a Turing Machine; 9.2 The All-Analog Machine; 9.3 The Partly Digital Computer; 9.4 A Reminiscence: The Stored-Program Loom in New Jersey; 9.5 Monsieur Jacquard's Loom; 9.6 Charles Babbage; 9.7 Babbage's Analytical Engine; 9.8 Augusta Ada Byron, Countess of Lovelace; 9.9 Turing's Abstraction
  • 10 Intrinsic Difficulty10.1 Being Robust; 10.2 The Polynomial/Exponential Dichotomy; 10.3 Turing Equivalence; 10.4 Two Important Problems; 10.5 Problems with Easily Checked Certificates (NP); 10.6 Reducing One Problem to Another; 10.7 Yes/No Problems; 10.8 Cook's Theorem: 3-SAT Is NP-Complete; 10.9 Thousands More NP-Complete Problems; 11 Searching for Magic; 11.1 Analog Attacks on NP-Complete Problems; 11.2 The Missing Law; 11.3 The Church-Turing Thesis; 11.4 The Extended Church-Turing Thesis; 11.5 Locality: From Einstein to Bell; 11.6 Behind the Quantum Curtain; 11.7 Quantum Hacking